Dempster Highway

Dempster Highway

The Dempster Highway, (Yukon Highway 5/Northwest Territories Route 8), completed in 1979, is a well maintained gravel and crushed stone road which extends 742 km/461 miles to Inuvik (Place of Man) an Inuit village 325 km/201 miles above the Arctic Circle in the Northwest Territories. This wilderness route spans remote regions of the Yukon cutting through two rugged mountain ranges, the Ogilvie and Richardson Mountains, miles of stunted spruce and alder “forests” (8′-12′ tall) in the Eagle Plains region, and elevated reaches of tundra, before dropping to the Mackenzie River and its flat aspen covered delta.

Services are limited on the Dempster. Gas, diesel fuel and repairs are available at Eagle Plains 365.7 km/227 miles, Ft. McPherson 555 km/345 miles, and at Inuvik. Appropriate preparation is essential.

Emergency services: Highway information 867-979-2040. Hospital 867-929-2955. Fire Station 867-929-2222. RCMP 867-929-2935.

Road conditions can also vary drastically. Check in Dawson City, or at the Klondike River Lodge (at junction of Klondike and Dempster Highways) for road conditions before beginning your trip. Signs at Eagle Plains remind you to check conditions again before venturing beyond that location. The Western Arctic Visitor Center on Front Street in Dawson City has all the latest information on the Dempster Highway and the NWT. Open June to September.

Be prepared to stop for approaching trucks, especially with dry, dusty conditions. Distances are in kilometres from the junction of the Dempster Highway with the Klondike Highway 37 km south of Dawson City.

0

Klondike River Lodge. 867-993-6892.

0.3

Klondike River Bridge, one-lane.

24.3

Glacier Creek.

28.6

Benson Creek.

40.7

Peasoup Creek.

50.4

Wolfe Creek. Indian fishing camp and turnout along bank.

58

Grizzly Creek. Mt. Robert Service to East.

65.1

Yukon Government Road Maintenance Camp.

66.6

First crossing of North Fork of Klondike River.

72.1

Parking with litter barrel and Information signs.  RCMP Commemorative sign reads: “The North West Mounted Police Winter Patrols passed this point on their annual 800 km/497 Kilometer trip from Dawson City to Fort McPherson. From 1904 on each patrol spent two or three months traveling by dog team to the Mackenzie Delta and back checking on area residents, carrying mail bound for Herschel Island and the NWT and exploring the little known region. The only tragedy during this time was the death of Fitzgerald’s `Lost Patrol’ in 1911. The increased use of radio communications and airplanes ended the need for the patrols.”

73

Tombstone Mountain Yukon government campground. Tombstone Mountain is a steep conical massif at the end of a broad sweeping valley. 36 camp sites, kitchen shelter, firepits, tables, water, toilets, hiking trails. There is an Fee area.

Interpretive Center operates during summer months, campfire talks, nature hikes, and local area information.

73.3

Parking.

75.8

Tombstone Mountain information sign.

 

85.9

First crossing East Fork of Blackstone River.

104

Two Moose Lake has viewing platform and waterfowl interpretive panels.

117.4

First crossing of West Fork of Blackstone River. Good grayling fishing, downstream where the east and west forks of the Blackstone River meet.

118

RCMP Commemorative sign reads: “The North West Mounted Police Winter Patrols passed this point on their annual 800 km/497 mile trip from Dawson City to Fort McPherson. From 1904 on each patrol spent two or three months traveling by dog team to the Mackenzie Delta and back checking on area residents, carrying mail bound for Herschel Island and the NWT and exploring the little known region. The only tragedy during this time was the death of Fitzgerald’s `Lost Patrol’ in 1911. The increased use of radio communications and airplanes ended the need for the patrols.”

124

Government airstrip.

170

Red culvert on side of road is due to iron oxide deposit causing red coloring of Engineer Creek for approximately 5 km.

172.8

Parking with views of erosion pillars.

193.4

Engineer Creek Yukon government campground. 15 camp sites, kitchen shelter, firepits, tables, water, toilets. Fishing for grayling. Fee area.

193.6

Jeckell Bridge (110 m/360 feet) and Ogilvie River. This bridge was built by the Canadian Forces Engineers as a training exercise.

221

Rest Area. Good grayling fishing in Ogilvie River.

237

Airstrip along road.

 

258.8

Ogilvie Ridge, Rest are,a toilets. Viewpoint with interpretive platform on geology of the area.

 

 

 

369.2

Eagle Plains, elevation 719 m/2,360 feet. Gas, restaurant, camping, dump station, Emergency airstrip on road. Eagle Plains Hotel. 867-993-2453. Bag Service 2735, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 3V5.

373.7

Short side road leads to information sign about Albert Johnson, “The Mad Trapper of Rat River”. One of the most famous man hunts in Canadian history began here during the winter of 1931-32. After a month and a half of eluding the Mounties Albert Johnson was killed, 80 km downstream from bridge, in a shoot-out in mid-February.

374

Bridge crosses Eagle River. The Canadian Forces Engineers built this bridge as a training exercise.

389.5

Landing strip on road.

405.6

Arctic Circle crossing. Note that the roadbed is built-up 8-12 feet above the surrounding tundra in this area to protect the permafrost, and the road surface.

433.6

Parking.

445.8

Rock River Yukon government campground. 20 camp sites, water, kitchen shelters, toilets. This is a beautiful spot. Fee area.

 

465

Yukon/Northwest Territories Boundary. Enter mountain time zone (add one hour to Yukon’s Pacific Time). Wright Pass. Information sign on the Dempster Highway.

 

508.9

Midway Lake.

 

539

Peel River Ferry. No charge. 8am-midnight, mid-June to mid-October. Accesses are quite steep. Cable guided ferry crossing takes 10 minutes.

 

548

Ft. McPherson airstrip.

555

Fort McPherson. All services available. Restaurant, hotel, gift shop, gas station.

Fort McPherson Tent & Canvas Factory. Some products that are manufactured are tents, backpacks, totebags, tepees. A gift shop is also on the premises.

587.4

Frog Creek, road east leads to picnic area. Grayling fishing.

607.3

Mackenzie River Ferry. No charge. 9am-midnight, mid-June to early October. The ferry will stop at Tshgehtchic (Arctic Red River) for passengers if necessary.

643

Rengling River crossing Grayling fishing.

708.9

Ehjuu Njik Territorial Day Use Area. Picnic tables, water, firewood. Fee area. Very well maintained

711.9

Nihtak Territorial day use and fishing access area. Picnic tables, water, firewood. Fee area.

742

Inuvik. Pop. approximately 3,400. Inuvik prospered as the hub for oil exploration in the western Arctic until that exploration moved north into the Beaufort Sea and its center became Tuktoyaktuk. Inuvik’s economy depends on muskrat trapping and fishing. It is also the location of several government agencies, a center for communication, transportation, commerce, and education. Notice the Utilidors (utility corridors) raised galvanized or concrete culverts that keep the community’s utility lines and pipes above the permafrost. Also note that all buildings are raised above the ground in order to prevent damage to the permafrost.

Western Arctic Visitors Association, Box 1525, Inuvik, NWT Canada, X0E 0T0. Located across from the hospital. Open May – September.
www.inuvik.ca

Arctic Nature Tours located next to Igloo Church. 867 777-3300. Tours include Tuktoyaktuk, Herschel Island, Mackenzie River, Sachs Harbour.
www.arcticnaturetours.com

Happy Valley Territorial Campground, located at the north end of town. Short walk to shops, restaurant etc. Wonderfully clean, hot shower rooms, electric hook-ups, water and tables. Fee area.

Inuvik Centennial Library 867-979-2747.