Ninilchik | Kenai Peninsula

Ninilchik lies on the west coast of the Kenai Peninsula on the Sterling Highway. Average annual precipitation is 24 inches.

The panoramic view across Cook Inlet from Ninilchik takes in an active volcano range. On a clear day, Mt. Augustine is seen to the far left, with Mt. Iliamna, Mt. Redoubt, and Mt. Spur to the right.

Visitors to Ninilchik will find all of the services necessary for the perfect vacation.

Excellent clamming and beachcombing can be found at low tide, and the tide pools reached along the north entrance to Deep Creek are entertaining for young or old.

In August, Ninilchik is the site of the `biggest little fair in  Alaska’ and you will find displays of berries, flowers, vegetables and crafts as well as animals of many kinds.

Whales, eagles and moose are frequently seen, and birdwatchers will  delight at the wide variety that inhabit the area. Mushrooms of many kinds can  be found in the surrounding wooded areas, but be careful as there are many poisonous varieties found in this area.

The Kenai – Alaska’s Playground: No other destination offers such an up close and personal Alaskan experience. With over 15,000 square miles of extraordinary adventure and excitement to choose from, even the rest of the state comes here when they need a reminder of why they moved to Alaska in the first place. That’s why it’s known as Alaska’s Playground.
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Ninilchik was first settled in the early 1800’s by Russian colonists. They subsisted on hunting, fur trapping, fishing, gardening and gold panning. At that time there were more than 200 people living in the little village. Some of the original buildings still exist and reflect the history and charm of those days. The old Russian Church and cemetery on top of the hill overlooking Ninilchik are great photo subjects and very interesting. Many descendants of those early families still live here.